RPS G-2 - Appendix 2

The ten principles of radiation risk management from the Fundamentals for Protection Against Ionising Radiation (2014)

The following ten principles of radiation risk management are explained in detail in Section 4 of the Fundamentals for Protection Against Ionising Radiation (2014) (RPS F-1):

  1. Clear division of responsibilities

(i)      The prime responsibility for management of radiation risks must rest with the person or organisation responsible for facilities and activities that give rise to radiation risks.

  1. Legislative and regulatory framework

(ii)       An effective framework including legislation, regulation and guidance to promote management of radiation risks, including an independent regulatory body, must be established and sustained.

  1. Leadership and management for safety

(iii)      Effective leadership and management of radiation risks must be established and sustained in organisations concerned with, and facilities and activities that give rise to, radiation risks.

  1. Justification

(iv)      Facilities and activities that give rise to radiation risks must yield an overall benefit.

  1. Optimisation of protection

(v)       Protection must be optimised so that radiation risks are as low as reasonably achievable.

  1. Limitation of risks

(vi)      Measures for controlling radiation risks must ensure that no individual bears an unacceptable risk of harm, and that the environment is protected.

  1. Protection of present and future generations

(vii)     People and the environment, present and future, must be protected against radiation risks.

  1. Prevention of accidents and malicious acts

(viii)    All practical efforts must be made to prevent and mitigate accidents, and acts with malicious intent, that may give rise to radiation risks.

  1. Emergency preparedness and response

(ix)      Arrangements must be made for emergency preparedness and response for incidents, accidents and malicious acts that may give rise to radiation risks.

  1. Protective actions to reduce existing or unregulated radiation risks

(x)       Protective actions to reduce existing or unregulated radiation risks must be justified and optimised.